April 26th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.
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Soaring Eagles Dancing in the Rain

By Roy Cook

At the risk of the cliché ‘rain dance’ the Soaring Eagle dance workshop on April 25, 2012 was successful in spite of the predicted precipitation this Wednesday. This evening began with a congratulatory talk for the dancers, by Chuck Cadotte, on the fine presentation for Dalai Lama at the SDSU Viejas arena. We made it home missing the wet roads and added hazards of the night.

Tonight, our SCAIR Senior Advisor Randy Edmonds provided the blessing for the feast. Also, tonight most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support were there for the benefit of the children:
announcements of community events and upcoming pow wows.

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There was a fine healthy mixed vegetable potluck: rice, AIWA provided pepperoni pizza, grilled mixed vegetables and fresh slaw. Later we had donuts and punch. We acknowledge and appreciate all parents and folks are ready to have a good generous time doing this potluck thing for the children. Our focus for the Soaring Eagle program is always the children.

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Our most democratic and teaching drum group: San Diego Inter-tribal singers were most pleased to set the dancers toes tapping. Ben brought in some bells for the students to enjoy and better find the rhythm of the drum. It is all a good thing we do for the children. For many looking on there was a faraway look in their eyes. As they heard the sound of the bells and songs and where they might have been when they heard the sound of the drum and Indian songs in the winds of times past. Old friends and children who are learning the songs and drum protocol gathered around and joined in with enthusiasm.

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Parent and friends participation are very important to the Tribal social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend the next Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community.

San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD, Ballard Parent Center, 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110.

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule as published:
May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays
June 13, Wednesday

The Soaring Eagle performance dance group will be very active over the remainder of the 2012 spring. For Soaring Eagle, contact: Vickie Gambala 619-306-7318.

May 4 - 6, 2012
2nd Annual THA Powwow National Orange Show Fairgrounds San Bernardino,Ca
Info: Michelle Dahl (800) 732-8805 x 1116
Head Staff MC: Ruben Littlehead AD: Rusty Gillette Dance Judge: Juaquin Hamilton Drum Judge: Randy Paskemin

May 5 & 6, 2012
Mother Earth People Inter-tribal Traditional Powwow Mojave Narrows Regional Park 18000 Yates Rd Victorville, Ca
$10 park fee, camping available Info: (760) 245-2398
MC - Bobby WhiteBird, Michael Reifel AD - Eugene Newman HGD - Steve Bohay Host Drum - Black Lodge Singers Host Southern Drum - Hale & Company Host Northern Drum - Blue Star
http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/mepic2012flyerfront.pdf

May 12 & 13, 2012
American Indian Culture Days Balboa Park,
Park Blvd & Presidents Way
San Diego, Ca
Info: Jonathan York @ (619) 281-5964

May 19 & 20, 2012

2nd Annual UCSD Powwow Muir Field,
UC San Diego 9450 Gillman Dr La Jolla, Ca
MC - Randy Edmonds Headman - Richard DeCrane Headlady - Nora Pulskamp Host Northern - Green River
Info: ucsdpowwow@gmail.com

May 11 - 13, 2012
Northern/Southern Winds Recognizing No Borders LA Historic Park
1245 N Spring St Los Angeles, Ca

May 11 - 13, 2012
41st Annual Stanford Powwow Eucalyptus Grove, Galvez and Campus Drives Stanford, Ca
Info: Maija Cruz @ (650) 723-4078

May 12 & 13, 2012
Cal State Dominguez Hills Powwow Sculpture Gardens, CSUDH 1000 E Victoria St Carson, Ca
Info: (310) 243-2438
MC - John Dawson AD - Victor Chavez Host Southern Drum - Sooner Nation Host Northern Drum - Changing Spirits
http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/CSUDH Pow Wow Flyer.pdf

May 12 & 13, 2012
19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow Mariposa County Fairgrounds Mariposa, Ca
Info: (209) 742-2244

May 18 - 20, 2012
Susanville Indian Rancheria 3rd Annual Memorial Powwow Lassen County Fairgrounds 195 Russell Ave Susanville, Ca
Info: Donna Clark @ (530) 257-5449
http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCSD.pdf

May 25 & 26, 2012
31st Annual UCR Honoring Our Warriors Powwow UCR Sports Complex 1000 West Blain St Riverside, Ca
Info: Maria Lorenzo @ (951) 827-4143
http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCR PW_2012.pdf

April 20th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Join Kumeyaay For SDSU Dalai Lama Presentation

By Roy Cook

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At the request of the Dalai Lama, April 19, 2012, local tribal Chairmen, singers and the Soaring Eagle children and dancers were at SDSU Viejas arena. Paul ‘Jr’ Cuero blessed the arena in anticipation for the spiritual context and message of the rest of the day. Local Kumeyaay Tukuk ‘Bird’ singers and dancers from the Campo Reservation presented songs and Kumeyaay traditional culture. Additionally the Dali Lama blessed the gourd rattle being used by Paul.

Following the Kumeyaay presentation the Soaring Eagles took the stages for the popular categories of Pow wow dance excitement. All enjoyed the children and adult dancers in beautiful regalia, feathers flying and bells ringing dancing with joy and pride of representing Native American culture.

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The Dalai Lama has left San Diego but everyone is welcome to enjoy the Soaring Eagle program. It provides Native American/Alaskan Native, K-12 students with an opportunity to learn traditional dance, regalia and respectful tribal customs. There are many entertaining and healthy activities for all ages and interests to enjoy.

The Soaring Eagle American Indian Children dance program is located in Old Town in the Ballard Parent Center. It serves as the home of San Diego Parent advisory committee. This is where parents learn how to strengthen their parenting skills, become more involved in their children’s education and improve their ability to communicate with their children. For more information please call Vickie Gambala 619-306-7318 or E-mail vgambala@cox.net. Thank you, Aho, Mehan.

April 12th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Prepare for Pow wow Season

By Roy Cook

Our focus for the Soaring Eagle program is always the children. This dance workshops enthusiasm and quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation in the songs and dance categories. This was reinforced by the presentation of the Carla Tourville filmed DVD of the SDSU pow wow last month. Multi-copies were distributed to the Soaring Eagle parents.

We continue to have new families and old friends arrive for a fine dance workshop this Wednesday April 11, 2012. Also, from the beginning of the evening to the end the Soaring Eagle, parents and children invitation to be a part of the Native American April 19, 2012 presentation for the Dali Lama continues to be a part of the structure of the dance workshop. Also announced is Earth Day celebration at the Rincon reservation on the 13th of this month. With this in mind the SCAIR tutor Jeanie Alvarado brought in two booklets: Earth Day workbook and the Force of Water. Water is a most relevant issue to Tribal America!

4/10/2012 11:09:00 AM
Kyl and McCain visit to Tuba City erupts into Hopi and Navajo protest
Crowd expresses displeasure with the two senators’ closed meeting discussions with Hopi and Navajo leaders over one of their most precious resources - water
Hopi and Navajo grassroots protestors showed up in the hundreds in Tuba City to show their joint tribal solidarity in voicing objections to any further negotiations or approval of the “Hopi Navajo Little Colorado Water Settlement Agreement” and to protest the senatorial visit by Republicans Jon Kyl and John McCain.
Hopi and Navajo grassroots protestors showed up in the hundreds in Tuba City to show their joint tribal solidarity in voicing objections to any further negotiations or approval of the “Hopi Navajo Little Colorado Water Settlement Agreement” and to protest the senatorial visit by Republicans Jon Kyl and John McCain.
Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly held a short press conference immediately after the Navajo portion of the closed executive meeting with Senators McCain and Kyl. The protesting crowd was extremely vocal in voicing their displeasure at any further discussion of approval for SB 2109. Shelly at one point threatened to leave, which the crowd responded to with, “Go! Get Going!”
Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly held a short press conference immediately after the Navajo portion of the closed executive meeting with Senators McCain and Kyl. The protesting crowd was extremely vocal in voicing their displeasure at any further discussion of approval for SB 2109. Shelly at one point threatened to leave, which the crowd responded to with, “Go! Get Going!”

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On April 5, Senators Jon Kyl and John McCain met with tribal leaders in Tuba City to urge them to move quickly on a proposed settlement of water-rights claims. Approximately 200 came out to protest Senate Bill 2109 titled “Navajo-Hopi Little Colorado River Water Rights Settlement Act of 2012.” Don’t miss the April 11 edition of the Navajo-Hopi Observer for the full story.

Rosanda Suetopka Thayer
The Observer

TUBA CITY, Ariz. - U.S. Senators Jon Kyl and John McCain traveled to Tuba City April 5 to meet with Hopi and Navajo tribal leaders.

Accompanied by bodyguards, they did not stay long after they were booed, hissed and jeered by Hopi, Navajo and non-Native crowd. A protest erupted, with the crowd showing their displeasure with the two senators’ closed meeting discussions with Hopi and Navajo leaders over one of their most precious tribal resources - water.

While Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly was finally forced to take public responsibility for initiating the northeastern Arizona visit by Republican Senators Kyl and McCain via a press release issued on April 4, the Navajo portion of the senatorial visit was to urge Navajo council delegates to move quickly to help push through the water rights settlement agreement through Congress before this session and Kyl’s term of office ends.

However, in a press release issued by Hopi Chairman Leroy Shingoitewa on April 6, Shingoitewa continued to claim that the Hopi portion of the senatorial visit was only to discuss “items of concern” not related to the Little Colorado River Water Settlement agreement.

Shingoitewa’s senatorial meeting agenda cited on the April 6 press release that the Hopi Council and its Water and Energy Team and council members were only going to discuss Hopi land acquisitions, environmental contamination issues, federal funding request for a new detention facility, and a request for a new school for Third Mesa area elementary students. A final disclaimer stated that “the 2012 Little Colorado Water Rights Settlement was not the focus of discussion between the senators and Hopi tribal leaders.”

Hopi and Navajo tribal members at the protest responded to the Hopi and Navajo press release statements.

“Then why all the secrecy? Why the closed doors to the Hopi and Navajo public and why can’t we as Hopi and Navajo members be allowed to listen in on these senate visits when it’s our water and our communal concerns that are being discussed? If it’s nothing to alarm us, there should be complete transparency,” said Martha Berman. Berman is a Navajo member from Canoncito (To’haajilee’) area near Albuquerque who drove with her sister the night before to be at the joint tribal Tuba City protest against the Little Colorado Water Rights Settlement agreement.

While Navajo President Ben Shelly addressed his own tribal people in a public press conference in uptown Tuba, Shingoitewa never left the Moencopi Legacy Inn to face his own tribal members who were standing outside the hotel parking lot waiting to hear from him on their concerns regarding their water.

Hopi police officers blocked the entrance to the Legacy Inn, not allowing any Hopi tribal members into the closed meeting.

SB 2109, introduced by Kyl in February, would require that both tribes “waive” all claims to the Little Colorado River water in exchange for three groundwater projects that would deliver drinking water to homes on both Hopi and Navajo who currently don’t have running water. The senators both admitted that their plan needs full tribal approval before they can go forward.

“We must decide whether we will support or not support this water act as soon as possible. This is partly because the current session of Congress is closing if we’re going to get this through,” said Erny Zah, press officer for Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly. President Shelly did issue an additional press release last week, which indicated that there will be a series of seven public meetings for his Navajo people. Shelly said that comments from those public sessions will be submitted to their tribal council on the Little Colorado River Settlement agreement,

Navajo tribal member Louise Benally expressed doubt about the success of that plan.

“How are seven meetings going to help us? We have over 100 chapters and many Navajos do not have access to vehicles to get to these limited seven meetings. If Ben Shelly or Rex Jim really wanted to hear from all of us, then they need to go to every single chapter even if that takes more time and money and translation from English into Navajo. That’s how important this water issue is to us,” said Benally.

Hopi opponents of the Little Colorado River Water Rights Settlement such as Benjamin Nuvamsa, Vernon Masayesva and Ivan Sidney - all former Hopi chairmen - have cautioned that the Little Colorado River proposal settlement agreement is nothing but empty promises.

“While Kyl, McCain, Shingoitewa and Shelly say they will provide much needed water to our communities, the groundwater projects for our people will come at a great and much more far reaching expense than just money. They also want us to forever extinguish and waive our future claims over our water rights and water quality, which will result in loss of our traditional values, culture, ceremonies and our sovereignty,” said Nuvamsa.

Both Hopi and Navajo tribal officials are now having to “back-pedal” on their preliminary senatorial “agreement in principle” that was referenced on a Feb. 17 letter from Jon Kyl to Sandy Fabritz-Whitney, director at the Arizona Department of Resources. The letter references “minor tribal issues that must be resolved” because the bill requires full tribal consent.

Heavy police presence from federal, tribal and Department of Public Safety officers at the peaceable protest also was a concern for both tribes’ members who wanted to be heard and visible against the Kyl and McCain visit.

Former Hopi tribal chairman Vernon Masayesva was one of the Navajo Police protest casualties. Masayesva was knocked to the floor at the Hogan Restaurant council meeting as he was trying to gain access along with former Navajo Nation President Milton Bluehouse to listen to the closed meeting topic.

“I was not even afforded the respect as a former Hopi chairman and long-time Hopi advocate of water rights, to listen in. I was instead shoved out of the meeting, knocked down and to make it worse, I was asked to leave the restaurant after sitting down inside to get something to eat by the restaurant manager. Who treats their own people like this? We are here to have our own voices heard about water and that is not being honored,” said Masayesva.

Both tribal leaders have since issued press statements saying they will provide more public education sessions with open transparency for their tribal members.

“Let’s see how accountable and honest Shingoitewa and Shelly are going to be, since we all heard and witnessed their promises about more public participation and input,” said Lawrence Hamana, Hopi tribal member from Moencopi Village. He traveled from Phoenix to be at the Tuba City protest.

A large portion of the success of the joint tribal protest march was due to technology with email, social websites like Facebook postings and cell phone interaction between several of the Hopi and Navajo grassroots organizers.

A strong cross-tribal support system has gained much support between Hopi and Navajo tribal community members who are technology savvy and have finely honed research skills, which has built up a tight cross-tribal “Kill the Bill” movement.

“It’s amazing what we can do in our own research for public documents, including information from Congress, with ‘Google’ and world web information at our fingertips. Public information is there for us as community members to check on environmental, science and federal, state financial information, we can quickly find out facts to help support our opposition to SB 2109,” stated one young Hopi tribal member from Hotevilla who was with his mom at the protest.


Almost each evening, as tonight, our SCAIR Senior Advisor Randy Edmonds provides the blessing for the feast. Also, tonight most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support are there for the benefit of the children: Elders. Inter-tribal drum and singers, dance mentors along with many community announcements, potluck: rice and meat, spaghetti in meat sauce, noodles with meat in red sauce and fresh strawberries. Later we had cookies, donuts, punch and hot coffee. And best of all, folks ready to have a good time doing this potluck thing for the children.

Parent and friends participation are very important to the Tribal social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community. San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD, Ballard Parent Center, 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110.

The Soaring Eagle performance dance group will be very active over the remainder of the 2012 spring: For Soaring Eagle, contact: Vickie Gambala 619-306-7318.

SDSU Viejas arena at Aztec bowl April 19, 2012.
Dalai Lama talks to the people.


Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

April 25- Wednesday

May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday


April 14, 2012

Fresno State First Nations Powwow
California State University, Fresno
5241 N Maple Ave
Fresno, Ca

Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MC - Bobby Whitebird
AD - Eugene Newman
Head Southern Singer - Steve Bohays
Host Northern Drum - Bearspring


April 14, 2012

DQ University Big Time Powwow
33250 County Road 31
Davis, Ca

Info: Dunn Eggink (707)677-5159


April 14 & 15, 2012

14th Annual Chumash Day Powwow
Head Gourd Dancer: Saginaw Grant

Malibu Bluffs Park
24250 Pacific Coast Hwy
Malibu, Ca

Info: Amy Crittenden, (310) 456-2489


April 20 - 22, 2012

26th Annual ASU Powwow
ASU Band Practice Field
6th St and Rural Rd
Tempe, AZ
Info: Lee @ (480) 965-5224

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/ASU2012Flier[1].pdf


April 21, 2012

27th Annual Youth Powwow
2010 Magnolia Ave
Sherman Indian High School
Riverside, Ca

Info: Josie Montes, (951) 276-6325 x303


April 21 & 22, 2012

27th Annual UCLA Powwow
UCLA North Athletic Field
220 West Plaza
Los Angeles, Ca

Info: (310) 206-7513


April 26 - 28, 2012

Gathering Of Nations
UNM Arena “The Pit”
330 Coors Blvd, Northwest
Albuquerque, NM

Info: Derek or Melonie Mathews @ (505) 836-2810


May 4 - 6, 2012

2nd Annual THA Powwow
National Orange Show Fairgrounds
San Bernardino,Ca

Info: Michelle Dahl (800) 732-8805 x 1116

Head Staff
MC: Ruben Littlehead
Arena Director: Rusty Gillette
Dance Judge: Juaquin Hamilton
Drum Judge: Randy Paskemin


May 5, 2012

UC Berkeley Powwow
West Circle Lawn


May 5 & 6, 2012

Mother Earth People Inter-tribal Traditional Powwow
Mojave Narrows Regional Park
18000 Yates Rd
Victorville, Ca

$10 park fee, camping available
Info: (760) 245-2398

MC - Bobby WhiteBird, Michael Reifel
AD - Eugene Newman
HGD - Steve Bohay
Host Drum - Black Lodge Singers
Host Southern Drum - Hale & Company
Host Northern Drum - Blue Star

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/mepic2012flyerfront.pdf


May 11 - 13, 2012

Northern/Southern Winds Recognizing No Borders
LA Historic Park
1245 N Spring St
Los Angeles, Ca


May 11 - 13, 2012

41st Annual Stanford Powwow
Eucalyptus Grove, Galvez and Campus Drives
Stanford, Ca

Info: Maija Cruz @ (650) 723-4078


May 12 & 13, 2012

Cal State Dominguez Hills Powwow
Sculpture Gardens, CSUDH
1000 E Victoria St
Carson, Ca

Info: (310) 243-2438

MC - John Dawson
AD - Victor Chavez
Host Southern Drum - Sooner Nation
Host Northern Drum - Changing Spirits

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/CSUDH Pow Wow Flyer.pdf


May 12 & 13, 2012

19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa County Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca

Info: (209) 742-2244


May 12 & 13, 2012

American Indian Culture Days
Balboa Park, Park Blvd & Presidents Way
San Diego, Ca

Info: Jonathan York @ (619) 281-5964


May 18 - 20, 2012

Susanville Indian Rancheria 3rd Annual Memorial Powwow
Lassen County Fairgrounds
195 Russell Ave
Susanville, Ca

Info: Donna Clark @ (530) 257-5449


May 19 & 20, 2012

2nd Annual UCSD Powwow
Muir Field, UC San Diego
9450 Gillman Dr
La Jolla, Ca

MC - Randy Edmonds
Headman - Richard DeCrane
Headlady - Nora Pulskamp
Host Northern Drum - Green River

Info: ucsdpowwow@gmail.com

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCSD.pdf


May 25 & 26, 2012

31st Annual UCR Honoring Our Warriors Powwow
UCR Sports Complex
1000 West Blain St
Riverside, Ca

Info: Maria Lorenzo @ (951) 827-4143

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCR PW_2012.pdf

March 29th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Under Venus Nights

By Roy Cook

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We have new families and old friends for a fine dance workshop this Wednesday March 28, 2012 evening. Past public performances at conferences and pow wows along with special invitations are a recent focus tonight.

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From beginning of the evening to the end the Soaring Eagle, parents and children invitation to be a part of the Native American April 19, 2012 presentation for the Dali Lama are part of the structure of the dance workshop. The special significance of the Dali Lama is brought out: For your information from the Roof of the World to the Land of Enchantment. The relationship between the Tibetans and the Hopi can be loosely examined but one can’t help but be overwhelmed with the similarities between the two cultures.

Besides their common physical appearances, their braided hair for male and females, etc, the Hopi and Tibetan people share many more cultural similarities. Both cultures have extensive use of turquoise jewelry to ward off evil. Both cultures exhibit similar use of silver and coral, as well as similar colors, materials and woven patterns of their textiles.

Also, During the Dalai Lama’s first visit to North America, he met with three Hopi elders. The spiritual leaders agreed to speak in only in their Native tongues. Through Hopi elder and interpreter Thomas Benyaca, delegation head one of the Grandfather’s first words to the Dalai Lama were: “Welcome home.”

The Dalai Lama laughed, noting the striking resemblance of the turquoise around Grandfather David’s neck to that of his homeland. He replied: “And where did you get your turquoise?”

Since that initial meeting, the Dalai Lama has visited Santa Fe to meet with Pueblo leaders, Tibetan Lamas have engaged in numerous dialogues with Hopis and other Southwestern Indians, and now, through a special resettlement program to bring Tibetan refugees to the United States, New Mexico has become a central home for relocated Tibetan families.

As exchanges become increasingly common between Native Americans and Tibetans, a sense of kinship and solidarity has developed between the cultures. While displacement and invasion have forced Tibetans to reach out to the global community in search of allies, the Hopi and other Southwestern Native Americans have sought an audience for their message of world peace and harmony with the earth. In the context of these encounters are the activities of writers and activists who are trying to bridge the two cultures. A flurry of books and articles has been published, arguing that Tibetans and Native Americans may share a common ancestry.

The perception of similarity between Native Americans of the Southwest and the Tibetans is undeniably striking. Beyond a common physicality and turquoise jewelry, parallels include the abundant use of silver and coral, the colors and patterns of textiles and long braided hair, sometimes decorated, worn by both men and women.

When William Pacheco, a Pueblo student, visited a Tibetan refugee camp in India, people often spoke Tibetan to him, assuming that he was one of them.

“Tibetans and Native American Pueblo people share a fondness for chile (though Tibetans claim pueblo chile is too mild!),” says Pacheco, “and a fondness for turquoise, used by both cultures as ways to ward off evil spirits. Also, the prophecy of Guru Rinpoche, when he said, ‘when Tibetans are scattered throughout the world, and horses run on iron wheels and when iron birds fly, the dharma will come to the land of the red man.’”

Even before most westerners knew where Tibet was, much less what their situation was, and almost twenty years before the advent of the Tibetan Diaspora, cultural affinities between these two peoples were noted by Frank Waters in his landmark work, Book of the Hopi (1963). Waters’ analysis went below the surface, citing corresponding systems of chakras or energy spots within the body meridians that were used to cultivate cosmic awareness. In The Masked Gods, a book about Pueblo and Navajo ceremonialism published in 1950, Waters observed that the Zuni Shalako dance symbolically mirrored the Tibetan journey of the dead. “To understand [the Shalako dance's] meaning, we must bear in mind all that we have learned of Pueblo and Navaho [sic] eschatology and its parallels found in the Bardo Thodal, The Tibetan Book of the Dead, in The Secret of the Golden Flower, the Chinese Book of Life, and in the Egyptian Book of the Dead.”

As is the case with most Earth-based cultures with a shamanic tradition, some Native ceremonies contain spiritual motifs similar to cultures from around the world (hence the broad comparison made by Waters). This could account for some of the similarities seen between Tibetan and Native American spiritual practices, such as Navajo sand painting, and cosmic themes found throughout traditional Pueblo dances.

But such comparisons hide the fact that there is no unified opinion among any indigenous groups, whether they are Tibetan or Native American. In the Southwest, for example, the Hopi and Navajo have distinctly separate cultures, religions and languages, yet they often get lumped together. Moreover, even among the Hopi, there is no single voice.” http://www.swcp.com/~eltiki/homie_page/articles/peblotibet.html

But our hearts and the primary goal of the Soaring Eagle program are always the children. This dance workshops enthusiasm and quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation in the songs and dance categories.

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Each evening most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support are there for the benefit of the children: Elders. Three drums and singers, dance mentors along with many community announcements, potluck: chicken, beans, spaghetti in meat sauce, spam, broccoli, green salad and rolls with butter. Later we had birthday theme cupcakes, chocolate cake, donuts, punch and hot coffee. And best of all, folks ready to have a good time doing this thing for the children.

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Parent and friends participation are very important to the social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community. San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD, Ballard Parent Center, 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110.

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The Soaring Eagle dance group will be very active over the remainder of the 2012 spring:

SDSU Viejas arena at Aztec bowl April 19, 2012.

Dali Lama talks to the people.

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

April 11, 25- all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday

April 7, 2012

40th Annual UC Davis Powwow
UCD Pavilion, LaRue Rd/Orchard Park Rd
Davis, Ca

Info: Melissa Johnson @ (530) 752-7032

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCDavis.jpg.jpg


April 14, 2012

Fresno State First Nations Powwow
California State University, Fresno
5241 N Maple Ave
Fresno, Ca

Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MC - Bobby Whitebird
AD - Eugene Newman
Head Southern Singer - Steve Bohay
Host Northern Drum - Bearspring


April 14, 2012

DQ University Big Time Powwow
33250 County Road 31
Davis, Ca

Info: Dunn Eggink (707)677-5159


April 14 & 15, 2012

14th Annual Chumash Day Powwow
Malibu Bluffs Park
24250 Pacific Coast Hwy
Malibu, Ca

Info: Amy Crittenden, (310) 456-2489


April 20 - 22, 2012

26th Annual ASU Powwow
ASU Band Practice Field
6th St and Rural Rd
Tempe, AZ

Info: Lee @ (480) 965-5224

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/ASU2012Flier[1].pdf


April 21, 2012

27th Annual Youth Powwow
2010 Magnolia Ave
Sherman Indian High School
Riverside, Ca

Info: Josie Montes, (951) 276-6325 x303


April 21 & 22, 2012

27th Annual UCLA Powwow
UCLA North Athletic Field
220 West Plaza
Los Angeles, Ca

Info: (310) 206-7513


April 26 - 28, 2012

Gathering Of Nations
UNM Arena “The Pit”
330 Coors Blvd, Northwest
Albuquerque, NM

Info: Derek or Melonie Mathews @ (505) 836-2810


May 4 - 6, 2012

2nd Annual THA Powwow
National Orange Show Fairgrounds
San Bernardino,Ca

Info: Michelle Dahl (800) 732-8805 x 1116

Head Staff
MC: Ruben Littlehead
Arena Director: Rusty Gillette
Dance Judge: Juaquin Hamilton
Drum Judge: Randy Paskemin


May 5, 2012

UC Berkeley Powwow
West Circle Lawn


May 5 & 6, 2012

Mother Earth People Inter-tribal Traditional Powwow
Mojave Narrows Regional Park
18000 Yates Rd
Victorville, Ca

$10 park fee, camping available
Info: (760) 245-2398

MC - Bobby WhiteBird, Michael Reifel
AD - Eugene Newman
HGD - Steve Bohay
Host Drum - Black Lodge Singers
Host Southern Drum - Hale & Company
Host Northern Drum - Blue Star

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/mepic2012flyerfront.pdf


May 11 - 13, 2012

Northern/Southern Winds Recognizing No Borders
LA Historic Park
1245 N Spring St
Los Angeles, Ca


May 11 - 13, 2012

41st Annual Stanford Powwow
Eucalyptus Grove, Galvez and Campus Drives
Stanford, Ca

Info: Maija Cruz @ (650) 723-4078


May 12 & 13, 2012

Cal State Dominguez Hills Powwow
Sculpture Gardens, CSUDH
1000 E Victoria St
Carson, Ca

Info: (310) 243-2438

MC - John Dawson
AD - Victor Chavez
Host Southern Drum - Sooner Nation
Host Northern Drum - Changing Spirits

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/CSUDH Pow Wow Flyer.pdf


May 12 & 13, 2012

19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa County Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca

Info: (209) 742-2244


May 12 & 13, 2012

American Indian Culture Days
Balboa Park, Park Blvd & Presidents Way
San Diego, Ca

Info: Jonathan York @ (619) 281-5964


May 18 - 20, 2012

Susanville Indian Rancheria 3rd Annual Memorial Powwow
Lassen County Fairgrounds
195 Russell Ave
Susanville, Ca

Info: Donna Clark @ (530) 257-5449


May 19 & 20, 2012

2nd Annual UCSD Powwow
Muir Field, UC San Diego
9450 Gillman Dr
La Jolla, Ca

MC - Randy Edmonds
Headman - Richard DeCrane
Headlady - Nora Pulskamp
Host Northern Drum - Green River

Info: ucsdpowwow@gmail.com

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCSD.pdf


May 25 & 26, 2012

31st Annual UCR Honoring Our Warriors Powwow
UCR Sports Complex
1000 West Blain St
Riverside, Ca

Info: Maria Lorenzo @ (951) 827-4143

http://goldenstategourdsociety.webs.com/UCR PW_2012.pdf

March 20th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagle @ SDSU Pow wow

By Roy Cook

The Soaring Eagles look forward to the San Diego State University annual pow wow. As do the: alumni, students, and faculty, staff and pow wow participants from many states and Canada that attend yearly. We hope you enjoy these images of the SDSU annual pow wow and the Soaring Eagles dancing.

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The SDSU campus has been a leader in inter-tribal celebrations of dance, music and culture. One of the first faculty to form an American Indian focus at SDSU is Dr. Gwendalle Cooper. She is this years’ SDSU Honoree.

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Each year the event has opened with a group reflecting the local Tipai-Kumeyaay song dance tradition. This year the Auka Wildcat singers under the leadership of Jon Meza Cuero sang for the first hour of the culture event.

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The American Indian Warrior Association patriotically brought in the Nations and service colors in the spectacular grand entry processional. Head staff, Royalty princesses, dance categories and the ‘Kodak moment’ precious tiny tot dancers.

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There is incredible beauty and pageantry on display at the SDSU Powwow and from a current perspective it offers an amazing look back into our nation’s history. Tribal dancers of all ages are dressed in colorful, traditional tribal regalia: feather bustles, deer buckskin, ribbon and beadwork and small metallic cones of the graceful jingle dress dancers.

The weather outside was frightful but inside was most delightful. Four fabulous drums sang excellent songs to move the dancers’ feet and reflect the many tributes and speeches that are special reflections of respect for being selected to a responsible position. It is a part of our Indian way to share our joy and graciously reflect honor bestowed on our family with a giveaway of items.

The Soaring Eagle program is all about the children. This quality and dedication is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation from beginning to end of the parents and children that are the Soaring Eagles.


To all our relations, Thank you, Mehan and Aho.

March 15th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagle Appreciation

By Roy Cook

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This evening focus reflects the very purpose of our commitment to this program. Our Indian children are so special to all of us. Soaring Eagle appreciation night was the spark of Richard Orvedal’s vision. With the cooperation of Christopher Scott of the AMIHC Youth Center and the founder of the Soaring Eagle dance and regalia workshop, Vickie Gambala. SCAIR Senior Advisor Randy Edmonds summarized the history of the Indian Education program and led the blessing for the evening’s feast. Every ones favorite: healthy burgers, hamburgers, hot dogs with all the fixings and Dijon mustard and pickles. Also there were many choices of yummy beans and rice, corn chips. The tables were festively covered and decorated with treats. (Enjoy the images from Abel Jacome.)

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All were well fed and ready to enjoy the individual recognition of each child’s participation in the Soaring Eagle program. On stage were two very large trophies for recent parade performances. There were touching and delightful moments and smiles as the children were offered opportunities to win extra prizes and many desert treats and snow cones. The evening was a total success!

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Everyone is welcome to enjoy the Soaring Eagle program. It provides Native American/Alaskan Native, K-12 students with an opportunity to learn traditional dance, regalia and respectful tribal customs. There are many entertaining and healthy activities for all ages and interests to enjoy. This evening SCAIR tutor, Jeanne Alvarado had educational booklets on: The St. Patrick Day Mystery and Why Can’t I? They were about children’s safety and behavior.

The Soaring Eagle American Indian Children dance program is located in Old Town in the Ballard Parent Center. It serves as the home of San Diego Parent advisory committee. This is where parents learn how to strengthen their parenting skills, become more involved in their children’s education and improve their ability to communicate with their children.

Finally, we all hope to see you and your family at the next American Indian community event.

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

March No class on 21 but yes on the 28th- Wednesday

April 11, 25- all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday

The Soaring Eagle performance dance group will be very active over the remainder of the month of March:

March 17 (All are invited, it will be inside)
San Diego State University
Click here for flier and here for event page
www.powwows.com

Date: Wednesday, March 21

Rancho Bernardo Inn- 11th annual Wellness conf. Okla.

Time 5:35 – 6:00 PM

Dinner will be served at 6:00PM

We need all the dancers to perform please call Chuck 619-994-0392 if you will be available to participate or e-mail Vickie vgambala@cox.net

APRIL 14
Fresno State First Nations Powwow
Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MAY 12 & 13
19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa Co. Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca
Info: (209) 742-2244

March 9th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Celebrate Spring

By Roy Cook

We had a fine dance workshop this Wednesday March 7, 12 night. But our hearts and the primary goal of the Soaring Eagle program are always the children. This dance workshops enthusiasm and quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation.

From beginning of the evening to the end the Soaring Eagle parent board, parents and children at the Soaring Eagles Dance Workshop are part of the Traditional American Indian community.

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We are all pleased that our Soaring Eagle dancer Dylan Allrunner, Cheyenne, as he was gifted a Southern Plains strait dance regalia. The outfit was made by David and Keri Gloria and gifted to him at no charge. Randy Edmonds announced that he would be formally brought into the arena at the San Diego State pow wow.

Each evening most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support are there for the benefit of the children: Elders. Singers, dance mentors along with community announcements, potluck: meat loaf, rice, green salad and pizza. Later we had Irish themed cupcakes and folks ready to have a good time doing this thing for the children.

Parent and friends participation are very important to the social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community. San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD, Ballard Parent Center, 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110.

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

March 14, 28- all Wednesdays

April 11, 25- all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday

The Soaring Eagle dance group will be very active over the remainder of the month:

AAIP CONFERENCE

Monday, March 12

6:00 – 7:00 PM

Location Hilton Hotel Embarcadero, San Diego, CA

AII 11TH ANNUAL NATIVE WOMEN & MEN’S WELLNESS CONFERENCE

Monday, March 19

8:35-9:00 AM

Rancho Bernardo Inn

Breakfast will be served 7:30 – 8:30 AM

We need all the adult dancers to perform please call Chuck 619-994-0392 if you

Will be available to participate and attend: E-mail Vickie vgambala@cox.net

Wednesday, March 21

5:35 – 6:00 PM

Dinner will be served at 6:00PM

We need all the dancers to perform please call Chuck 619-994-0392 if you will be available to participate or e-mail Vickie vgambala@cox.net

MAR 10&11
Cal State Long Beach Pow wow
Upper Campus Quad, CSU Long Beach
Long Beach, Calif.
Contact - Anna Nazarian-Peters (562) 985-8528

March 17
San Diego State University
Click here for flier and here for event page
www.powwows.com

APRIL 14
Fresno State First Nations Powwow
Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MAY 12 & 13
19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa Co. Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca
Info: (209) 742-2244

March 2nd, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Dance in the Leap Year

By Roy Cook


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The primary goal of the Soaring Eagle program is the children. This dance workshops quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation, from beginning to end, of the parents and children at the Soaring Eagles workshop.


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This 29/2/12 Wednesday night most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support were there for the benefit of the children: Elders, Boom box CDs, dance mentors along with community announcements, food and folks ready to have a good time doing this thing for the children.

SCAIR Senior Advisor Randy Edmonds delivered the blessing for the food and asked for prayers for those whose relatives had passed on and for those in need of compassion and a kind word. For dinner there was enchiladas, rice, beans, green beans, pizza, salad. For dessert homemade chocolate cake.

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After the meal the board presented themselves to the Vickie Gambala, Christopher Scott, Vera Tucker, Carla Tourville, Richard Orvedal and Abel Jacome.  They welcomed the new families present.

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Chuck Cadotte (dance instructor) took the class back  to the basics powwow 101.  He instructed every category showing the kids dance steps.  It was very nice to see this,seeing older ones mentor the younger ones. Kids were having fun.Old and young enjoyed taking a turn around the middle of the dance floor tonight.  Class was relaxed and enjoyable,even though there was no drum we used a CD player.


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Parent and friends participation are very important to the social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community.


The Indian children are our Soaring Eagle workshop priority and our Indian culture future. Come on down to the Ballard parent center for the pow wow dance, music and also enjoy the friendship of the winter 2012 Soaring Eagle gatherings.

Finally, we feel very good that there is again with this first month of the New Year, a spirit of enthusiasm, harmony and balance. These are qualities that we will look and strive toward in the 2012 pow wow dance circle.


—-EVENTS-ACTIVITIES—-

ALSO: March 4,
Women’s Military History Day at Veterans Museum & Memorial Center (VMMC)

10:00 - 12:45 Films on Women’s Service Organizations in US Military

1:00-4:00 Women Veterans Tell Their Own Stories: WWII to OIF/OEF

VMMC- 2115 Park Blvd, Balboa Park


Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

March 7, 14 & 28, all Wednesdays

April 11, 25, all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23, all Wednesdays

June 13 on Wednesday.

San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD. Ballard Parent Center.

2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110

MAR 10&11
Cal State Long Beach Pow wow
Upper Campus Quad, CSU Long Beach
Long Beach, Calif.
Contact - Anna Nazarian-Peters (562) 985-8528

March 17

San Diego State Univ.

Annual Pow wow

Head staff: TBA

APRIL 14
Fresno State First Nations Powwow
Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MAY 12 & 13
19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa Co. Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca
Info: (209) 742-2244

February 24th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Blocked Out

By Roy Cook

We did not have a dance workshop this week. But our hearts and the primary goal of the Soaring Eagle program are always the children. Our plans for the next one are February 29, Wednesday. The leap day of the 2012 year! This dance workshops enthusiasm and quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation. From beginning of the evening to the end the parents and children at the Soaring Eagles Dance Workshop are part of the Traditional American Indian community.

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We are all very proud of our Soaring Eagle dancer from the Abel Jacome family: Monica! She will be recognized at the Youth Center Community night on Friday night, 2/24/12. She was selected to be the Wild Horse Pow wow Princess for the next year, CONGRATULATIONS! Enjoy the pictures of her, the pow wow and our last SE workshop too.

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Each evening most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support are there for the benefit of the children: Elders. Singers, dance mentors along with community announcements, food and folks ready to have a good time doing this thing for the children.

Parent and friends participation are very important to the social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community.

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

February 29 Wednesday (leap year)

March 7, 14, 28- all Wednesdays

April 11, 25- all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday

Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD. Ballard Parent Center. 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110

FEB 25
67th Anniversary Iwo Jima Flag Raising
Veterans Memorial Park
Sacaton, AZ
Click here for Flier

MAR 10&11
Cal State Long Beach Pow wow
Upper Campus Quad, CSU Long Beach
Long Beach, Calif.
Contact - Anna Nazarian-Peters (562) 985-8528

March 17
San Diego State University
Click here for flier
and here for event page
www.powwows.com

APRIL 14
Fresno State First Nations Powwow
Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MAY 12 & 13
19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa Co. Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca
Info: (209) 742-2244

February 15th, 2012

San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

clip_image0011Soaring Eagles Skip a Beat

By Roy Cook

We will not have a dance workshop this Wednesday night. But our hearts and the primary goal of the Soaring Eagle program are always the children. The next is February 23 Thursday, This dance workshops enthusiasm and quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation. From beginning of the evening to the end the parents and children at the Soaring Eagles Dance Workshop are part of the Traditional American Indian community.

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Each evening most of our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support are there for the benefit of the children: Elders. Singers, dance mentors along with community announcements, food and folks ready to have a good time doing this thing for the children.

princess

We are all very proud of our Soaring Eagle dancer from the Abel Jacome family: Monica! She has been selected to be the Wild Horse Pow wow Princess for the next year, CONGRADULATIONS! Enjoy the pictures of: her, the pow wow and our last workshop too.

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Parent and friends participation are very important to the social aspect of the program success. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Traditional Indian way to practice hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community.For more soaring Eagle picts from the Wild horse Pow wow try here

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule:

February 23 Thur., 29 Wed.

March 7, 14, 28- all Wednesdays

April 11, 25- all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23- all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday

Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD. Ballard Parent Center. 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110

Soaring Eagle Director Vickie Gambala

Contact- 619-266-2887

Here’s the flyer for the SDSU Pow Wow. http://www.powwows.com//gathering/image/flyers/1328597438_2012SDSU_Final.pdf
and here is the event page https://www.facebook.com/events/320011928040649/

http://www.powwows.com//gathering/images/flyers/1328597438_2012SDSU_Final.pdf

www.powwows.com

FEB 24 - 26
Annual Quechan Pow Wow

FEB 25
67th Anniversary Iwo Jima Flag Raising
Veterans Memorial Park
Sacaton, AZ
Click here for Flier

MAR 10&11
Cal State Long Beach Pow wow
Upper Campus Quad, CSU Long Beach
Long Beach, Calif.
Contact - Anna Nazarian-Peters (562) 985-8528

March 17

San Diego State Univ.

Annual Pow wow

Head staff: TBA

APRIL 14
Fresno State First Nations Powwow
Info: Angie Segura, (559) 307-7865

MAY 12 & 13
19th Annual Chi-Tock-Non Kote-U-Pu Powwow
Mariposa Co. Fairgrounds
Mariposa, Ca
Info: (209) 742-2244