San Diego Soaring Eagles stories are brought to you by Southern California American Indian Resource, SCAIR.

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Soaring Eagles Sparkle Tonight

By Roy Cook

The Soaring Eagles were participants in the Harbor Balloon parade.

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Our positive Soaring Eagle dance workshop elements of support were there for the benefit of the children last Wednesday night: Elders. Singers, dance mentors along with community announcements, food and folks ready to have a good time doing this thing for the children. We have been active sharing our Native American heritage with the rest of the San Diego region.

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This evening we again had three groups utilize the same location and time frame: the SDSU Alumni group met at 5:30pm in room 3 and the American Indian Warriors also held their monthly meeting early in the evening in the large room. This is a wonderful setting and opportunity to meet with many members of the Native American Inter-tribal community.

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Richard Decrane organized and hefted much of the load setting up the room for the dance workshop tonight. SCAIR Senior Advisor Randy Edmonds delivered the blessing for the food and asked for prayers for those in need. The evening pot luck feast was supported with a good response. Our, Aho thanks to Debbie and her Father, Paul Razo. Parent and friends participation are very important to the social aspect of the program success because we are without outside organization support for the food and paper goods. Remember to bring a potluck item or side dish for the Soaring Eagles dance workshop evening feast. It is our Indian way to demonstrate hospitality and generosity when we invite all to attend an Indian gathering and share the meal with the whole community.

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We enjoyed the songs of two drums tonight. SCAIR tutor Jeanne Alvarado had booklets for the younger children. One was on visiting a copper mine. I found it told about the Southern Arizona, Bisbee mine. It was nostalgic for me since I was born in Tucson, Arizona. We invite you to bring your children and family to learn about Inter-tribal dance and regalia by observation and participation in a traditional way. Winter and the clear skies over San Diego inspire us to look to the stars and recall stories from our Tribal literature of twice told tales. I’ve been thinking about the Cheyenne story of Coyote and his dancing with the stars:

COYOTE DANCES WITH THE STARS

Because the Great Mystery Power had given Coyote much of his medicine,
Coyote himself grew very powerful and conceited.
There was nothing, he believed, that he couldn’t do.
He even thought he was more powerful than the Great Mystery,
for Coyote was sometimes wise but also a fool.
One day long ago, it came into his mind to dance with a star.
“I really feel like doing this,” he said.
He saw a bright star coming up from behind a mountain, and called out:
“Hoh, you star, wait and come down! I want to dance with you.”

The star descended until Coyote could get hold of him,
and then soared up into the sky, with Coyote hanging on for dear life.
Round and round the sky went the star.
Coyote became very tired, and the arm that was holding onto the star grew numb,
as if it were coming out of its socket!
“Star,” he said, “I believe I’ve done enough dancing for now. I’ll let go and be getting back home.”
“No, wait; we’re too high up,” said the star.
“Wait until I come lower over the mountain where I picked you up.”

Coyote looked down at the earth. He thought it seemed quite near.
“I’m tired, star; I think I’ll leave now; we’re low enough,” he said, and let go.

Coyote had made a bad mistake. He dropped down, down, down.
He fell for a full ten winters. He plopped through the earth clouds at last,
and when he finally hit ground, he was flattened out like a tanned, stretched deerskin.
So he died right there.

Now, the Great Mystery Power had amused himself by giving Coyote several lives.
It took Coyote quite a few winters, however, to puff himself up again into his old shape.
He had grown quite a bit older in all that time,
but he had not grown less foolish.
He boasted: “Who besides me could dance with stars, and fall out of the sky for ten long winters,
and be flattened out like a deer hide, and live to tell the tale?
I am Coyote. I am powerful. I can do anything!”

Coyote was sitting in front of his lodge one night, when from behind the mountain rose a strange kind of star,
a very fast one, trailing a long, shining tail.
Coyote said to himself: “Look at that fast star; what fun to dance with him!”
He called out: “Hoh, strange star with the long tail! Wait for me; come down; let’s dance!”

The strange, fast star shot down, and Coyote grabbed hold.
The star whirled off into the vastness of the universe. Again Coyote had made a bad mistake.
Looking up from his lodge into the sky, he had had no idea of that star’s real speed.
It was the fastest thing in the universe.


Bit by bit, small pieces of Coyote were torn off in this mad race through the skies,
until at last only Coyote’s right hand was holding onto that fast star.

Coyote fell back down to earth in little pieces, a bit here and a bit there.
But soon the pieces started looking for each other, slowly coming together, forming up into Coyote again.

It took a long time; several winters.
At last Coyote was whole again except for his right hand, which was still whirling around in space with the star.
Coyote called out: “Great Mystery! I was wrong! I’m not as powerful as you.
I’m not as powerful as I thought, Have pity on me!”

Then the Great Mystery Power spoke: “Friend Coyote. I have given you four lives.
Two you have already wasted foolishly. Better watch out!”
“Have pity on me,” wailed Coyote. “Give me back my right hand.”
“That’s up to the star with the long tail, my friend. You must have patience.
Wait until the star appears to you, rising from behind the mountain again.
Then maybe he will shake your hand off.”
“How often does this star come over the mountain?”
“Once in a hundred lifetimes,” said the Great Mystery.

Or you may wish to dance over to YouTube and see the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dbBR1WZBw4&noredirect=1

The primary goal of the Soaring Eagle program is the children. This workshops quality is evident in the initiative, joy, pride of tribal identity and participation, from beginning to end, of the parents and children at the Soaring Eagles workshop.

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The Indian children are our Soaring Eagle workshop priority and our Indian culture future. Come on down to the Ballard parent center for the pow wow dance, music and also enjoy the friendship of the 2012 Soaring Eagle gatherings.

Finally, we feel very good that there is again with this New Year, a spirit of enthusiasm, harmony and balance. These are qualities that we will look and strive toward in the 2012 dance circle.

Soaring Eagle and American Indian Warrior Association, until further notice, will meet at the Ballard “Old Town” location, 2375 Congress St. San Diego, CA 92110, for the pot luck dance workshop dinner meeting.

Soaring Eagle 2012 Workshop schedule: (as available to date)

January 11, 25 all Wednesdays

February 1, 8, 23, 30 all Wednesdays

March 7, 14, 28 all Wednesdays

April 11, 25 all Wednesdays

May 2, 9, 23 all Wednesdays

June 13, Wednesday.

San Diego Unified School District, SDUSD.

Harold J. Ballard Parent Center.

2375 Congress St
San Diego, CA 92110

SOARING EAGLE EVENTS SCHEDULE:

Martin Luther King parade, Sunday, Jan 15, 12. Soaring Eagles park and assemble at County Health, end of Grape St. Just like the Balloon parade, the TV and judges will be in front of the SD County Administration building.